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0745277331 bookings@bnsafrika.com

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Parks & Reserves

Parks & Reserves
Amboseli
Serengeti
Masai Mara
Lake Nakuru
Laikipia
Meru
Ngorongoro

Amboseli is famous for its huge herds of elephant and iconic views of snow-capped Mt. Kilimanjaro which is the highest Mountain in Africa and the world’s highest freestanding mountain. The wildlife to be seen here includes Masai giraffe, hyena, lion Oryx, buffalo, various gazelle and antelope, leopard, cheetah and over 400 species of birds.

You will be staying at the Amboseli Serena which is inside the National Park at the base of Mt. Kilimanjaro. Your full board package includes accommodation, meals, tea and coffee, and game drives. You will also have special evening activities to choose from.

In the vast plains of Serengeti National Park, comprising 1.5 million hectares of savannah, the annual migration of two million wildebeests plus hundreds of thousands of gazelles and zebras – followed by their predators in their annual migration in search of pasture and water – is one of the most impressive nature spectacles in the world. The biological diversity of the park is very high with at least four globally threatened or endangered animal species: black rhinoceros, elephant, wild dog, and cheetah.

Masai Mara National Reserve is one of the most famous conservation areas in the world and has been referred to as the “the safari jewel”. It is home to much of the African animal kingdom. You can easily spot animals such as lion, hippo, crocodile, giraffe, wildebeest, zebra, buffalo, warthog, hyena, jackal, leopard, elephant, gazelle, impala and other antelope. In addition to the animals, the reserve also has diverse birdlife.

The most impressive feature is the annual migration with hundreds of thousands of wildebeest and zebra from the plains of the Serengeti in Tanzania crossing the border to reach the vast fertile plains of the Masai Mara. (This occurs between July and October.) They are stalked by predators including lion, cheetah and hyena with vultures awaiting their opportunity to feast on the kills. During the migration, you may be fortunate enough to witness a “river crossing” as masses of wildebeest and zebra plunge into the water while crocodile seek their chance to attack.

This popular safari offers the traveler a superb experience of seeing the amazing wildlife and scenery of the renowned Masai Mara as well as the opportunity to learn about the customs and culture of the Masai people who have lived alongside wildlife for centuries

Lake Nakuru National Park lies 140km northwest of Nairobi, in Nakuru district of the Rift Valley Province. The ecosystem comprises of the lake, surrounded by mainly wooded and bushy grasslands. The park supports wide ecological diversity with Flamingos (Greater and Lesser) as well as other water birds being the major attractions of the area. The ecosystem supports about 56 different species of mammals including both black and white rhino as well as a variety of terrestrial birds numbering nearly 450 species.

The climate around the lake ranges from cool to hot and humid. The annual rainfall is 965mm which is lower than many other parts of Kenya. The wettest months are March to May and October to December, but even at these times it is not as rainy as other areas. Lake Nakuru National Park hosts 5 globally threatened species, and is an important stop on the African-Eurasian Migratory route. Drive through the unique vegetation and the biggest euphorbia forest in Africa. Viewpoints include Lion Hill, Baboon Cliff and Out of Africa and the beautiful waterfall at Makalia.

With endless panoramas, big open skies, wild Northern rangelands, semi deserts of Northern Kenya, dry forests and waterfalls, the iconic backdrop of Mt Kenya , spectacular gorges at the edge of the Great Rift Valley over 80 mammal species and 450 species of birds, Laikipia is a photographers haven!

Riding through Laikipia on horseback can be relaxed, thrilling, amusing, interesting, but never dull as you ride your way through ranches and community areas or even up Mt Kenya’s moorlands. Experience riding on the plains with a herd of zebra, walking gently through a canopy of giraffe or past a herd of elephant or buffalo. On horseback it is possible to get unusually close to wildlife. Enjoy riding alongside the big game animals that abound Laikipia.

For the spirited adventurer, mountain bikes offer a unique way to explore some of Laikipia’s varied terrain and stunning flora and fauna be it through forests, rolling hills or expansive plains.

A great way to view the stunning bio diversity of Laikipia is on foot accompanied by Samburu or Maasai guides whose knowledge of local flora, fauna, cultural and history is unmatched. Or even experience a rites of passage Samburu ceremony.

One of the best ways to view the wildlife on safari is on a game drive. Whether you go early in the morning or late afternoon, you own informative guide will take you in an open vehicle across the open plains, through the bush or along the river bank viewing the wide variety of game, birds, plants and trees. You have a chance to enjoy both day and night game drives in Laikipia.

Meru National Park, where George and Joy Adamson released their most famous lioness, Elsa, back into the wild (a story immortalized in the book and film Born Free), is increasingly re-appearing on safari itineraries. After it was founded in 1966, the park, run by one of Kenya’s most energetic wardens, Peter Jenkins, was a popular destination for safaris. But it fell into neglect in the 1980s, and for more than a decade, into the late 1990s, this entrancing wilderness was virtually off limits due to out-of-control poaching. Then, championed by the International Fund for Animal Welfare, with the support of the EU, the park became a KWS cause célèbre and was comprehensively restored, with newly cut earth roads, a dedicated force of rangers led by a new warden (Peter Jenkins’ son Mark Jenkins), and a poacher-proof rhino sanctuary near the main gate which is home to both white and black rhinos.

Meru’s numerous streams and rivers are a characteristic feature of the landscape. Be sure to visit the Rojewero viewpoint and boardwalk – a lovely spot to stretch your legs and take in the dense riverine forest. There are good hippo, croc and fish-eagle-spotting opportunities in the area. Driving around Meru National Park through the thick bush, you’re also likely to have close encounters with some of the park’s huge herds of buffalo – the key prey for Meru’s lion prides.

The Ngorongoro Conservation Area is a protected area and a World Heritage Site located 180 km west of Arusha in the Crater Highlands area of Tanzania. The area is named after Ngorongoro Crater, a large volcanic caldera within the area.