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0745277331 bookings@bnsafrika.com

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After creating an account, you'll be able to track your payment status, track the confirmation and you can also rate the tour after you finished the tour.
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Tour Tips

Luggage

Luggage is an important aspect of your safari and weight allowances do vary depending on which safari you travel on.  Always travel with soft-sided bags as hard suitcases are unsuitable for safaris and will most likely get damaged along the way.  More important is observation of the weight restriction on light aircraft flights, which can be anything from 15kg in total to around 20gk in total – including your hand luggage and your photographic equipment.  Extra weight allowance can be purchased in advance – normally by purchasing an extra seat weight allowance. Suitcases and other heavier items can usually be stored in city hotels while on safari – please ask.

What to Pack

This list is not exhaustive but will offer you an idea of what to pack for your safari.  We are always available to offer you advice on the telephone or by email before you travel and any last minutes queries or questions:

  • Long sleeved light shirts or t-shirts
  • Short sleeved shirts or t-shirts
  • Long lightweight /fast drying trousers (some offer insect repellent)
  • Shorts if required
  • Soft broad-brimmed hat and a good pair of sunglasses
  • A warm jacket (a lightweight down jacket is ideal) with hood if travelling in cooler winter months or
  • A lightweight, windproof top – early mornings on open vehicles can be chilly, even in the heat of summer.  If travelling in green season do take a waterproof jacket.
  • Buffs (multi-functional tubular bandanna) or cotton kikoi/sarongs – a must for keeping your hair off your face or protected from the elements, the sun or cold wind off your neck and the dust off your camera
  • Warm tops (fleece/hoodie type)
  • 3 pairs of socks (again good with insect repellents
  • PJs and underwear
  • 1 pair lightweight but sturdy closed shoes (waterproof/quick drying)
  • 1 pair sandals or flip-flops
  • Your favourite travel-size toiletries (many lodges and camps offer eco-friendly toiletries)
  • A small torch /spare batteries 
  • Sunblock and sun-protective lip-balm – high SPF
  • Mosquito repellent (most effective with DEET)
  • Rehydration Salts – very important.  You can also take a sports rehydration product and drink lots of water on a daily basis to avoid getting dehydrated in the first place
  • A small supply of travel medicines such as malaria tablets, anti histamines, diarrhea medication, a bottle of TCP or liquid antiseptic, plasters – all may come in handy.
  • Wildlife and bird guides
  • Camera equipment with good zoom lens. Extra batteries and SIM cards are very useful!
Travelling with children

There are many safaris which specifically cater for and welcome children of all ages throughout Africa and this is where we can help you!  It is essential to find a safari which is entirely compatible with the ages of your children, your interests and who you are travelling with.

We can recommend accommodation or full itineraries specifically tailored to your expectations – from private safari houses in the Masai Mara or Swahili coast to adventurous small group journeys all the family can enjoy.

We are being increasingly asked for multi generational journeys – grandparents, parents and grandchildren – or groups of friends who love travelling together. 

Whatever the ages of your children please do contact us and let us know the ages of your children, who is travelling, your interests and what you are hoping to see and a rough idea of your budget and we will be delighted to recommend options for you family!

Currency

This varies from country to country.  Do take a credit card (or two!) but do not rely on it as remote lodges may not have signal when you are checking out.  Some lodges do accept US Dollar and Pound Sterling travellers’ cheques but again please do ask before you go. On the whole USD cash and a small amount of local currency is best – bring cards and cheques as back up.  

In South Africa and Namibia Rand is best. Please remember to use official money-changing agencies such as banks, ATM’s and at hotel reception areas and avoid street-dealers who may pass on fake notes or give you the wrong change.

Drinking water

Many lodges will now offer you your own drinking bottle for the duration of your stay which you can fill up at a designated filtered and safe water station before you go out on your game drive.  This reduces the number of plastic bottles consumed in very vulneralbe wilderness areas and eliminates the need to fly or transport plastic out.  Most lodges and camps throughout Africa and india are aware of the dangers of local water to their guests and will only offer you bottled or mineral water and ice during your stay.  When out and about do double check that caps are sealed on the water bottles you buy and do beware of consuming ice and ice cream purchased locally.

Photography

Always take a couple of SIM cards and a spare battery – just to be safe.  If using an old camera do take enough film and spare batteries, as both are usually expensive to buy locally.

If possible do bring a a waterproof/dustproof bag to cover your camera equipment.  For good bird and animal photography, a 200mm lens is the minimum recommendation.

Please always ask permission before taking photos of local people.

There is more to Kenya than safaris, from coral reefs and white-sand beaches to a rich diverse culture of the Kenyan people (plus a tourism infrastructure that can get you to all of them) you’re not likely to get bored.

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